Table Scraps

Table Scraps

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Okay, that blog post title was funny, wasn't it!!?? What did you think I was going to blog about, composting? No, silly, this post is about using up those left over fabric strips to make something beautiful for your table!

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I definitely have a thing for quilted table runners--they're just fun and fast to make, plus quick for changing up the look of your table for the different seasons. 

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This is my second time making my Stacked Strips Table Runner. See the original tutorial with instructions, HERE. I stitched this one exactly the same as the first, with 2"-wide strips but the finished size of this second runner is larger and finishes out at 18" x 84". The beauty of this pattern is you can easily customize the size to fit your table. 

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The fabrics used in this runner are all Art Gallery Fabrics and include prints from all six of my fabric lines. Here's the list: Pure Elements solids, AGF linen, Gossamer, Sketchbook, Coastline, Tapestry, Bountiful, Signature, and Ink Outburst from Woodland Fusions.

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The other variation I made from my original pattern was to utilize Quilt As You Go (QAYG) when sewing the strips together. By doing this, not only was I assembling the runner top, but I was quilting the runner as I sewed the strips!

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Using QAYG for a table runner is a great way to try this method on a small project. I used my favorite Tuscany Silk Blend batting and AGF linen for the backing to give the runner a nice weight and feel. To learn how to sew the QAYG method for quilts and other projects check out my dear friend and sister AGF designer Maureen Cracknell's QAYG Craftsy class

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This was really fun to make and since I had some strips left at the end, I decided to make some matching coasters!

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My coasters finish at 4-1/2" round and I trimmed the strips to 1-1/2" wide to start with so the scale would be better proportioned. You could even start with 1" wide strips if you wanted even more fabrics in the coaster.

I used the same strip assembly method of sewing strips short ends together before trimming to the desired size and sewing together QAYG-style to a batting and backing foundation.

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After I had the strips sewn into a large enough piece to cut out 5" circles from, I placed another piece of linen, right sides together with the QAYG piece and marked out circles with the bottom of a tin that was the right size. 

I sewed a 1/4" inside the drawn line, back stitching at beginning and end, and leaving and opening for turning. 

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Cut out on the drawn line. Clip curves and turn right side out through the opening. Turn opening under 1/4" and press. Blind stitch opening closed by hand. 

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I did not do any additional quilting or stitching to my coasters once turned. This method has four layers: patchwork top, batting, and two layers of linen. 

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I think next time I try this I will make some placemats. It's really very addictive and I'm sure we all have a bunch of left over fabric scraps begging to be turned into something useful and beautiful!

Endless Summer

Endless Summer

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It's such an honor to be part of Mathew Boudreaux aka Mister Domestic's blog tour! Mathew launched his first fabric collection, Loved to Pieces for Art Gallery Fabrics this spring and I couldn't be happier for him!

Mathew's a power house of positive energy and brilliant sewing ideas. He's lovable and personable and you can't help but have a smile after watching his engaging You Tube videos!

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Here's the amazing line up of designers for his tour:

Mister Domestic’s Loved to Pieces Blog Party

Monday July 16: Amanda Woodruff of A Crafty Fox

Tuesday July 17: Sharon Holland of Sharon Holland Designs

Wednesday July 18: Angela Wolf of Angela Wolf Pattern Collection

Thursday July 19: Brittany Jones of Brittany Jones

Friday July 20: Sharon McConnell of Color Girl Quilts

Saturday July 21: Elina Temmes of Elina Temmes

Monday July 23: Meghan Buchanan of Then Came June

Tuesday July 24: Nicole Daksiewicz of Modern Handcraft

Wednesday July 25: Cristy Stuhldreher of I Love You Sew

Thursday July 26: Kate Basti of Quilt with Kate

Friday July 27: Courtney Davis posting at Melly Sews

Sunday July 29: Mimi Goodwin of Mimi G Style

Monday July 30: Kim Niedzwiecki of Go Go Kim

Tuesday July 31: Tara Curtis of Wefty Needle

Wednesday August 1: Saija Kiiskinen of Saija Kiiskinen

Thursday August 2: Jodi Godfrey of Tales of Cloth

Sunday August 5: Brett Lewis of Natural Born Quilter

Monday August 6: Karen Tripp of The DIY Addict

Tuesday August 7: Tracy Martin of Tracy Bug Creative

Wednesday August 8: Sharon Burgess of Lilabelle Lane Creations

Thursday August 9: Maureen Cracknell of Maureen Cracknell Handmade

Friday August 10: Kylie Gersekowski of Little Moo Designs

 

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With the wind of his daughter Helena’s love at his back, Matthew created Loved To Pieces. Helena's love for flowers and Mathew's love for paper piecing fused into a world where florals and EPP geometrics play against an array of blue tones with touches of vibrant pinks and subtle greens.

To signify the eternal love that's woven into every fiber of this collection I chose to make my Endless Summer table runner that I designed and first published in July/August 2013 Quilt-it...today magazine. 

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This runner is made from half-square triangles and quarter-square triangles and the overall effect is as if it's been woven and a nod to Mathew's amazing woven fabrics sewing projects. There's a lot of pieces but once you make the units you're ready to put the runner together so it actually goes together pretty quickly. If you need extra help with HST and QST triangles, take a look at my tutorial for them HERE.

To share the love, this is now a free pattern for you to download from my Free Patterns page

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I adore using a striped print for binding, don't you? To get the maximum effect, it's best to cut a striped binding on the bias. For a tutorial on how to cut and attach regular and bias binding, see my How to Bind a Quilt tutorial.

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I really love the colors in Mathew's collection and these cool greens and aqua's are scrumptious and made me feel like I was in a Mediterranean getaway! You better believe I ate those props after the photoshoot!

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I didn't have enough left over of the striped print to cover the back so I added my Woodblock Splendid print for AGF to each end, giving this runner a second look if flipped over.

The machine quilting is kept very simple because I didn't want to take anything away from the pretty prints. I followed the overall shape of the radiating rings which was plenty of quilting to use on the Hobbs Tuscany Silk Batting that's the perfect thickness for a table runner. 

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Be sure to follow along on the blog tour and on Mathew's blog and @MisterDomestic Instagram as he'll be having weekly drawings for Loved to Pieces fat quarter bundles and loads of sewing inspiration. 

Happy sewing,

Sharon

Behind the Signature Look Book Projects Part 1 - Baby Room

Behind the Signature Look Book Projects Part 1 - Baby Room

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There's so much yet to share about my new Signature fabric for Art Gallery Fabrics. It's such a fun collection I want to take extra time and a more intimate look at my projects that went into the AGF Signature Look Book (plus the ones that never got their time to shine on the virtual pages). 

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First, the Hexie Turtle, come on, how adorable is this!!!! 

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I picked up this homemade footstool at a garage sale. This footstool was really pretty ugly when I first saw it and actually left the garage sale without it only to think about it more and return later to still find it there. Once I thought about making a hexagon patchwork cover for the stool THEN I could see it's value! 

After taking off all the UGLY upholstery and heavy fringe, I spray painted the brown painted wood copper for a little bling. I used Red Pepper Quilts Hexagon Tutorial for how to sew hexagons together and made a large enough patchwork to cover my turtle.

A little bit of vintage fringe in a more appropriate scale for the stool and the results are nothing less than magical!

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Another footstool makeover happened to a piece I already had around the house. It too is a vintage, homemade stool I picked up at a yard sale years ago. It's now looking fresh and new with it's Signature Extempore Gala canvas top and vintage pompom fringe.

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Cute, huh?!!! For a tutorial on how to make the Hoop Art hanging above the chair, see my Signature Butterflies post.

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You may have noticed the fun floor lamp with the Flora and Fauna Hidden fabric lamp shade? Yup, I recovered a vintage lampshade for the most adorable coordinate for this baby room. 

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This is my second time recovering this shade and it's even more special this time being finished in my own print. For an idea of how I made a new cover for this shade, visit the Craft Stylish tutorial.

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What a great way to customize the look of a room!

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This adorable tote bag made in Small World Sprightly print from Signature is a free pattern from Dritz Sewing. My bag is based on one of 20 different ways Dritz has used a basic tote bag and jazzed it up with their incredible assortment of bag hardware and Dritz sewing accessories. 

Discover oodles of amazing projects on the Dritz blog. I'm so honored they have featured my free Bucket Bag pattern on their Make Something Dritz blog: Favorite Finds: Bucket Bag Sewing with Signature Fabrics from Sharon Holland.

I'm so pleased that Dritz and Omnigrid will both be sponsors of the My Signature Sampler sew along!

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Instead of using the canvas from my collection I sewed my tote with quilt-weight cotton. To give the bag more body I made two exterior bag shapes per the Dritz tutorial and used one for a lining which I added a big pocket before assembling into a lined bag. I simply slipped the lining, wrong sides together into the exterior, added a ribbon loop with Dritz D-ring to the upper edge and sewed the seam allowance turned-under edges to close. 

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The fun coordinating Pencil Pouch is a free pattern on my Free Patterns page. It's the perfect size for supplies and fits into a 3-ring binder with the Extra-Large Eyelets from Dritz Sewing. I love their antique brass finish! For even more fun, add a tassel with the easy-to-use Tassel Cap, also from Dritz. 

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There's more Signature Baby's Room to share by I'll save that for next week's Part 2. 

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If you're wanting to sew with Signature fabrics ask for them at your local quilt shop or shop online. Hawthorne Threads just restocked their supply and has the full collection plus bundles available. Other favorites like Fat Quarter Shop and Needle in a Fabric Stash also carry the full line. Find these fine shops and more listings on my Fabrics page.

See you Friday when I post my next block in the My Signature Sampler and announce the next great giveaway!

Signature Butterflies

Signature Butterflies

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When I was planning my projects for my new Signature fabrics collection for Art Gallery fabrics I created rooms and looks, then designed my sewing around what would fit into those rooms. 

One of the looks is what I'm calling the Signature Baby Room. I wanted a gender-neutral room for a baby or young child that loves nature. Using my granddaughter as my model toddler, I knew there had to be butterflies, because she LOVES butterflies!

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My original inspiration for making butterflies using fabric came from Kim of Go-Go Kim. Kim has a great tutorial for gluing fabric to paper to hang butterflies in shadow boxes. I wanted to make a bit sturdier butterfly with all fabric and came up with a hybrid of sorts...

Materials Needed for Making Signature Butterflies:

  • Signature Butterfly Templates
  • Fabric scraps at least 1/4'' larger around than template size
  • Heat n Bond Lite iron-on adhesive or similar product like Pellon EZ-Steam one-sided pressure sensitive fusible web (optional, see next item on list)
  • Pellon TP970 Thermolam Plus Sew-in fleece (Note: If using a fleece with an adhesive side, omit iron-on adhesive product from the line above)
  • Iron and pressing cloth
  • Coordinating thread
  • Scissors
  • Air-solvable marking tool
  • Spray paint (optional)
  • Frame or shadow box

Making Butterflies

Download the Signature Butterfly Templates and print out at actual size. Check for accuracy using the 1'' reference square on the PDF. Cut out butterfly shapes. Tip: For a more durable template, print onto card stock paper. 

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On the Pellon Thermolam Plus Sew-in fleece, trace around desired butterfly shapes, leaving at least 1/8'' between shapes. Note: There's no right or wrong side to sew-in fleece but if using a fleece with an adhesive side then draw on the non-adhesive side. 

Following the manufactuer's instructions, adhere the iron-on adhesive (Heat n Bond or EZ-Steam type product) to the unmarked side of the fleece. Omit if using a fleece with an adhesive backing.

My butterflies only have fabric on one side and those wishing to do the same can move onto the next step noting that my tutorial images reflect only one side with fabric. But, if you're planning on fabric backing both the front and the back of your butterflies then adhere iron-on adhesive to the marked side of the fleece as well before moving to the next step, leaving the paper backing on until ready to adhere to fabric.

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Cut out butterfly shapes.

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Following the manufacturer's instructions, fuse the adhesive side(s) of the fleece butterfly shape to the wrong side of desired fabric(s). 

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Cut out butterfly shape using the edge of the fleece as your guide.

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To add even more durability to your butterfly, add decorative stitches around the shape, add details like body shape, or embellish as desired. 

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I always love playing around with materials and thinking outside the box. Because I wanted to add a bit of bling to my butterflies and include some metallic elements I decided to try spray painting the backs. 

Using a piece of cardboard and pin to hold the butterfly in place while I sprayed it I was very pleased how the gold spray paint took on the fleece backing. It didn't change the feel of the fleece and gave a nice gold tipped edge to my creations. 

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After the spray paint dried, I could go back in and add more dimension to my butterfly by folding and sewing very close the the folded body edges. 

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Let Your Imagination Soar!

Once know this technique for fusing fabric to fleece and making butterflies, the sky's the limit to what you can create. 

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My largest butterfly became an unique piece of art when I hand stitched it to the center of a rush placemat from Target. 

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I used this technique to cover a mirror with fabric faced fleece and simply glued the fleece in place with Aleene's No-Sew Fabric Glue so it's non-permanent and can easily be removed with water in the future. 

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To fill the gaps between my mirror backing and the frame I used fabric glue to attach some Dritz natural-colored Twist Cord to act like decorative molding. 

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A 3-D butterfly was simply pinned with a decorative straight pin directly to the fabric backing. 

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For this bejeweled shadow box I fleece backed fabric in the same technique as in the above projects and cut a backing size to fit a dollar store shadow box frame that had a saying printed on the backing. The opaque quality of the fleece blocked out the saying on the picture. Before hot gluing the fleece back fabric to the frame I pinned vintage brooches to the fabric for a one-of-a-kind, nature-inspired wall art. 

Hoop Art

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For a more traditional way to create art for your walls and bring nature inside is to use prints from my Signature and embellish them with embroidery and appliqué. For my Hoop Art I fussy cut a bouquet from my Extempore Celebration print and appliquéd a dragonfly, bee, and butterfly from the Small World Sprightly print. 

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Starting with an over-sized square each I sandwiched the following materials: Extempore Celebration right sides up on top, Hobb's Tuscany Silk batting in the center, and a Pure Element solid right side out on the back. I embellished the main print with embroidery and quilting stitches then added needle turn appliquéd cut outs from the Small World Sprightly print with blanket stitch edge detail. 

Once all the needle work was done, I re-stretched the art in the hoop, secured it tightly with the screw at the top, then trimmed the edge of the fabrics even with the edge of the hoop. 

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I hope this gives you some new ideas for how to customize and create art for your home. So many more things can be done with these techniques--I hope you'll give it a try!